Boating safely in the water

A flashlight, extra batteries, extra clothing and blankets, maps, flares and a first-aid kit are all good items to bring along. Never allow passengers to ride on gunwales or seatbacks or outside of protective railings, including the front of a pontoon boat.

Protect yourself by only diving in areas that are known to be safe, such as the deep end of a supervised pool. You must know and obey the laws. Here are a few suggestions that will help keep you safe while you're out enjoying your boat or personal watercraft.

Your state may also require that you wear an approved life jacket for water skiing and other on-water activities. Powerboats must yield to sailboats and boats being rowed or paddled. Page Last Reviewed or Updated: That way, if you do get into trouble, someone will have an idea of where to look for you.

Many boat insurance companies will offer discounts on boating insurance to boaters who successfully complete About Boating Safely. Up to half of all boating accidents involve alcohol, and a person under the influence is up to 10 times more likely to be killed in a boating accident than one who has not been drinking.

Most water-related accidents can be avoided by knowing how to stay safe and following a few simple guidelines. Safe boating - overloading [Video, 1: Boat Safety Tip 7: Any boat being overtaken has the right of way.

And taking a boating safety course might make you eligible for insurance discounts.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

You are responsible for the safety of those on board your boat, and other boaters that share the water. Be sure to check that your boat is running properly before casting off.

A "No Diving" sign means the water isn't safe for a head-first entry. If bad weather is approaching, get off the water early to avoid a long waiting line in inclement weather. Other important safety gear would include a tow line, jumper cables, extra paddle or oar, fire extinguisher, something to use for bailing in the event that your vessel takes on water and audible and visual distress signaling devices such as a whistle, air horn, orange smoke device and flares.

Check the boat landing for any local regulations that apply. You should also educate yourself about distress signals and navigational lights and signals. If you're unable to swim away from the current, stay calm and float with the current. Some states won't allow people under a certain age to operate these devices; others require you to take a course or pass a test before you can ride one.

Alcohol distorts our judgment no matter where we are — but that distortion is even greater on the water.

Water Safety

You need more energy to handle the currents and other changing conditions in the open water. That can be hard, especially when your friends are challenging you — but it's a pretty sure bet they'd rather have you safe and alive.

Personal watercraft ownership is increasing every year — and so are accidents relating to these craft. Boat Safety Tip 5: Fill portable fuel tanks on the dock.

Coast Guard warns about a condition called boater's fatigue, which means that the wind, noise, heat, and vibration of the boat all combine to wear you down when you're on the water.

In the event that something does go wrong, lifeguards are trained in rescue techniques.Be a Better Boater, Learn from the Best, and Be Part of the Action. Volunteer to make a difference! Consider furthering your boating knowledge and safety on the water by joining the U.S.

Coast Guard Auxiliary. The U.S. Coast Guards Boating Safety Division (CG-BSX-2) is dedicated to reducing loss of life, injuries and property damage that occurs on U.S. Waterways by improving the knowledge, skill and abilities of recreational boaters. My favorite time to go fishing and boating is whenever I can; that said, my second favorite time to be on the water is in the fall.

The warm days, the cool evenings, the hot fishing bite, and the colorful foliage are all excellent reasons. The U.S. Coast Guards Boating Safety Division (CG-BSX-2) is dedicated to reducing loss of life, injuries and property damage that occurs on U.S.

Waterways by improving the knowledge, skill and abilities of recreational boaters. Boat Safety Tip 5: Know the rules. Be sure to educate yourself about boating laws and rules. You are responsible for the safety of those on board your boat, and other boaters that share the water.

You must know and obey the laws. You should also educate yourself about distress signals and. After leaving the boat launch, maintain slow-no-wake speed for a safe and legal distance from the launch. Follow boat traffic rules.

Water Safety

Safe boating - navigation right of way [Video, ] Take special cold water precautions in spring.

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Boating safely in the water
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